Rumba Basic Step - What is That Basic Step - latindancing.net

Rumba Basic Step – What is That Basic Step


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Rumba is a kind of Latin dance which originated in Cuba. It is considered the most popular Cuban dancing style, which is characterized by its fast-paced beats and strong rhythms. The best way to learn it is to learn the basic steps of Rumba and master them so you can start learning it on your own. If you are a beginner, it is important that you start learning it with the help of a good instructor who has both the ability to teach you well on the basics of it and the experience of teaching others. There are many kinds of dance steps that you will need to learn, like footwork, standing or balancing on one foot, turning, jumping, and many others.

Rumba Basic Step

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The first Rumba basic step is the starting point where both the right and left feet should be placed flat on the floor. The starting position for this dance step is called the mambo. In order to improve the footwork, you have to keep practicing this step.

The second Rumba basic step is the forward bend or the walk. For this step, both feet should be placed flat on the floor, with both the right and left feet in a straight line. Then you have to lift your leg while keeping your knee bent at an approximate 90 degrees angle. The left foot is then placed on top of the right foot. Straighten the knee and the hip of the left foot while keeping the foot of the right foot flat on the floor.

The third Rumba basic step is the sisal kick or the ball step. For this step, the left foot has to be placed flat on the floor while the right foot has to be lifted up with the heel slightly. Bring the right foot down to the ground while bringing the left foot towards the inside of the left foot. Kick off with the right foot.

Things To Consider

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The fourth Rumba basic step is the samba kick or the ball step. For this step, the left foot needs to be placed flat on the ground while the right foot needs to be lifted up with the heel slightly. Then bring both feet together while turning the right foot towards the inside of the foot with the left foot. Kick off with the right foot.

The fifth Rumba step is the sancharasana or the rising sun drill. For this step, both the feet should be in a straight line while the hips are not dipping down, nor are they bending in any way. Then the torso is turned to the right while the head is raised high, and the eyes are fixed in some direction. Kick off the foot that is higher than the other two.

The sixth Rumba step is the Santana or the dancing pole drill. For this step, the man is to stand in front of the pole with his hands at his sides. In a circular motion, the hips are turned with the knees bending. Then the body is turned to the left as the arms are raised high above the head. Kick off the foot that is closer to the front with the toes.

The seventh Rumba basic step is the samba kick or the jumping pole drill. For this step, the man is to stand in front of the pole with his hands at his side. Then he kicks off with his right foot, but the Pole is turned to the left. Kick off the foot that is closer to the front with the toes.

The eighth Rumba step is the Londa kick or the sidekick. In this step, the man is to stand with both feet together. The man kicks his foot out while keeping the pole between his legs. Kick the foot that is closest to the inside towards his opponent.

Bottom Line

The ninth Rumba step is the samba kick or the high kick. For this step, the man is to stand in front of the pole with his right leg out in front. With the other leg, he kicks straight up into the air. Kick the foot that is in front of the opponent.

These are the nine basic steps that are required in the Rumba dance. If you want to master Rumba, then it would be better if you perform these steps in a class first before stepping out on your own. After all, this would prepare you for the real deal. You should also learn how to properly dance the Rumba to impress your audience and other people.

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